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Carbon Monoxide – The Silent Killer, Precautions Everyone Can Take
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By Member Mike Fronimos
December 6, 2017

As the weather gets colder people tend to seek alternate ways to heat their homes and businesses. The Williston Fire Department, along with our partners in public safety want to ensure that our community is utilizing safe practices while using gas furnaces, wood burning stoves and fire places or oil burning stoves. All of these heating sources can give off carbon monoxide, but there are several other sources that give off CO, such as vehicles, generators and other equipment.

Carbon Monoxide is known as the silent killer because it is tasteless, odorless and colorless. This "silent killer" is produced by burning fuel in cars or trucks, small engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, fireplaces, gas ranges, portable generators or furnaces. When the gas builds up in enclosed spaces, people or animals who breathe it can be poisoned. Ventilation does not guarantee safety.

Every year over 400 people die from unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning according to the Center for Disease Control & Prevention. Annually, more than 20,000 visit the emergency room, and more than 4,000 others are hospitalized. The Consumer Product Safety Commission says about 170 people in the United States die every year from carbon monoxide produced by non-automotive consumer products, such as room heaters. So as the weather turns colder, it's important to take extra precautions.

Here are helpful suggestions and safety tips regarding Carbon Monoxide.


Carbon Monoxide (CO) Safety tips
• CO alarms should be installed in a central location outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home and in other locations where required by applicable laws, codes or standards. For the best protection, interconnect all CO alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
• Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for placement and mounting height.
• Choose a CO alarm that has the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
• Call your local fire department’s non-emergency number to find out what number to call if the CO alarm sounds.
• Test CO alarms at least once a month; replace them according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
• If the audible trouble signal sounds, check for low batteries. If the battery is low, replace it. If it still sounds, call the fire department.
• If the CO alarm sounds, immediately move to a fresh air location outdoors or by an open window or door. Make sure everyone inside the home is accounted for. Call for help from a fresh air location and stay there until emergency personnel.
• If you need to warm a vehicle, remove it from the garage immediately after starting it. Do not run a vehicle or other fueled engine or motor indoors, even if garage doors are open. Make sure the exhaust pipe of a running vehicle is not covered with snow.
• During and after a snowstorm, make sure vents for the dryer, furnace, stove, and fireplace are clear of snow build-up.
• A generator should be used in a well-ventilated location outdoors away from windows, doors and vent openings.
• Gas or charcoal grills can produce CO — only use outside.


Symptoms of Carbon Monoxide (CO) poisoning
CO enters the body through breathing. CO poisoning can be confused with flu symptoms, food poisoning and other illnesses. Some symptoms include shortness of breath, nausea, dizziness, light headedness or headaches. High levels of CO can be fatal, causing death within minutes.
The concentration of CO, measured in parts per million (ppm) is a determining factor in the symptoms for an average, healthy adult.
• 50 ppm: No adverse effects with 8 hours of exposure.
• 200 ppm: Mild headache after 2-3 hours of exposure.
• 400 ppm: Headache and nausea after 1-2 hours of exposure.
• 800 ppm: Headache, nausea, and dizziness after 45 minutes; collapse and unconsciousness after 1 hour of exposure.
• 1,000 ppm: Loss of consciousness after 1 hour of exposure.
• 1,600 ppm: Headache, nausea, and dizziness after 20 minutes of exposure.
• 3,200 ppm: Headache, nausea, and dizziness after 5-10 minutes; collapse and unconsciousness after 30 minutes of exposure.
• 6,400 ppm: Headache and dizziness after 1-2 minutes; unconsciousness and danger of death after 10-15 minutes of exposure.
• 12,800 ppm: Immediate physiological effects, unconsciousness and danger of death after 1-3 minutes of exposure.

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Williston Fire Department
317 11th St W
Williston, ND 58801
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